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  • November 16, 2020 9:00 AM | Edith Gong (Administrator)

    Click to enlargeVoices from the Railroad: Stories by descendants of Chinese railroad workers is a book published by the Chinese Historical Society of America (CHSA) that reveals the stories of Chinese railroad workers and their descendants. These stories have never been told outside of their families until now. Learn about Chin Lin Sou, Hung Lai Woh, Jim King, Lim Lip Hong, Lee Ling & Lee Yik Gim, Lee Wong Sang, Lum Ah Chew, Mock Chuck, & Moy Jin Mun, workers of the Central Pacific Railroad. No longer nameless, faceless workers lost to history, their stories will shatter misconceptions about the Chinese who helped build America.

    Co-edited by Sue Lee & Connie Young Yu, this book features first-hand narratives by railroad worker descendants: Gene O. Chan, Montgomery Hom, Carolyn Kuhn, Paulette Liang, Russell N. Low, Sandra K. Lee, Andrea Yee, Vicki Tong Young, and Connie Young Yu. Featured in the book are photographs and historic documents that link Chinese railroad workers to living descendants.

    New in the 2020 edition is a section dedicated to the 150th Anniversary of the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad held at Promontory Summit, Utah.

    The book can be ordered from CHSA’s online store.

    For wholesale or bulk orders, contact: info@chsa.org.

  • November 11, 2020 3:52 PM | Anonymous


    Join our men and women veterans from all branches of service and conflicts as they tell us in their own words about their experiences on this Veterans Day.

    American Legion Cathay Post 384, the Chinese American G.I. Project, and the Chinese American Citizens Alliance are proud to present a retrospective program by Montgomery Hom, Executive Producer, honoring Chinese American Veterans from the battlefields of WWII to the mountains of Afghanistan.


    Ming-Na Wen, celebrated actress and narrator for Montgomery Hom’s Emmy-nominated PBS documentary film, “We Served with Pride”, shares her family’s legacy of service at time 22:30 of the video recording.

  • November 06, 2020 3:36 PM | Anonymous

    The Chinatown Bridge Archway featuring a mosaic-covered dragon is now up in Downtown Santa Cruz. The archway is stationed at the Front Street entrance to the popular pedestrian and bike bridge that crosses the San Lorenzo River and leads into San Lorenzo Park. It was created to recognize and honor the final Chinatown in Santa Cruz that once thrived along the west side of the San Lorenzo River.


    The dragon archway will also feature poems in Chinese characters in stainless steel plaques that will be powder-coated in red in addition to brass plaques that will read in Chinese script: Chinatown Santa Cruz. The lettering will be lit by solar-powered Chinese-style lanterns. Photos created in brass of the story of Chinatown will also be mounted on the archway.

    A formal ribbon-cutting ceremony will be staged in the spring.

    Before you visit, take a look back at the history of Santa Cruz County’s forgotten Chinatowns in a 3D scan of the Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History’s 2019 exhibition: Guided by Ghosts.

  • October 10, 2020 2:44 PM | Anonymous


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    Watch the recording of the Zoom webinar below:


  • September 26, 2020 4:46 PM | Elyse Wong (Administrator)

    As we commemorate the 75th anniversary of the end of WWII and honor our Chinese American veterans from the Golden State, we will listen and learn from our most senior WWII Chinese American veterans, plus currently serving and retired military personnel, as they share their personal stories and their messages to future generations. This is a very historic gathering of all Chinese American military personnel, both past and present.

    In addition, view the premiere of the short feature, “We Served with Pride, the road to the Congressional Gold Medal,” at time 33:00:00 of the video and listen to CHCP Advisory Board Member / Historian Connie Young Yu at time 1:03:30.

  • September 02, 2020 10:36 PM | Edith Gong (Administrator)

    Recording of the 9/2/20 SPICE webinar “Angel Island Immigration Station: the Hidden History” with Connie Young Yu and Jonas Edman. This webinar is a joint collaboration between the Center for East Asian Studies and Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE) at Stanford University.

    CHCP Advisory Board Member/Historian Connie Young Yu speaks about how the Chinese detention barracks on Angel Island were saved from demolition in the 1970s, opening the door to the hidden history of the immigration station. She recounts the experience of her grandmother, Mrs. Lee Yoke Suey, who was detained in the barracks for 15 and a half months starting in 1924 and how the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit ruled on her grandmother’s case.

    SPICE worked with graphic artist Rich Lee to publish “Angel Island: The Chinese-American Experience.” Its author, Jonas Edman, shares activities and materials from this graphic novel that tells the story of Chinese immigrants who were detained at Angel Island Immigration Station in San Francisco Bay between 1910 and 1940.

  • September 01, 2020 6:30 PM | Edith Gong (Administrator)

    By Christian Jochim, 2020 CHCP Secretary

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    CHCP successfully spearheaded a letter-writing campaign to urge the SJ City Council to vote for the “Heinlenville Park” name for a new Japantown park. The park is to be located where the former Heinlenville Chinatown existed from 1887 to 1931.

    CHCP, founded in 1987 to rebuild the replica Ng Shing Gung temple in History Park, has long identified with the temple’s original home of Heinlenville, not only by featuring the rebuilt temple as its Chinese American Historical Museum, but also by promoting the video “Home Base: A Chinatown Called Heinlenville” and by offering a Heinlen Award for extraordinary contributions to preserving Chinese American culture by local non-Chinese Americans.

    The recording of the proceedings of the City Council meeting can be viewed below. Listen to CHCP Director Brenda Hee Wong speak at time 3:01:00 of the proceedings.


  • August 29, 2020 5:00 PM | Edith Gong (Administrator)


    August 29, 2020 webinar sponsored by:

    Webinar Agenda:

    • “Fog of War” – video of events leading up to the beginning of WWII through the eyes of Chinese Americans
    • Keynote: Montgomery Hom, who takes you down into the trenches to provide a unique perspective of WWII Chinese American memorabilia and personal stories
    • “We Served with Pride” – preview clip of video featuring Chinese American WWII Vets, who served with uncommon valor
    • Panelists providing personal stories of how Chinese Americans contributed on the front line and home front:
      • Major General William Chen – US Army (ret.)
      • Connie Young Yu – Author, Historian, CHCP Advisory Board Member
      • Montgomery Hom – Military Historian, Author, Filmmaker
  • August 26, 2020 7:00 AM | Edith Gong (Administrator)

    When Tennessee ratified the 19th Amendment on August 18, 1920, the amendment passed its final hurdle of obtaining three-fourths of the states. Certification of the ratification occurred shortly after…on August 26, 1920.

    In honor of the many brave women, who worked so hard …and so long… to make this a reality, we are sharing the video, “CA Women Inspire”.  The host is Jennifer Siebel Newsom, California’s First Lady. It starts with indigenous women and goes all the way to recent times.


    ASIAN AMERICAN SUFFRAGISTS

    Mabel Lee (NY Tribune 1912)

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    Mabel Lee was a suffragist who mobilized the Chinese community in America to support the women’s right to vote, and in 1921, she became the first Chinese woman in the United States to earn a doctorate degree. On July 24, 2018, legislation was signed to designate Manhattan’s Chinatown Post Office in New York City as the “Mabel Lee Memorial Post Office.”

    The following video showcases two important Asian American suffragists: the aforementioned Dr. Mabel Ping-Hua Lee and Tye Leung Schulze, American by birth, who was the first Chinese woman to vote in a Presidential primary.

  • August 14, 2020 9:00 AM | Edith Gong (Administrator)

    CHCP is saddened to advise that Coby Yee, a featured panelist in our "East meets West: Chinatown Nightclubs" webinar, died peacefully August 14, 2020, at the age of 93.

    If you wish to see Coby full of life, love and laughter, view the webinar recording taken July 15.

Museum Address:

History Park
635 Phelan Avenue
San Jose, CA 95112

In Ng Shing Gung Building

Mailing Address:

PO Box 5366
San Jose, CA 95150-5366

Email: info@chcp.org

Chinese Historical & Cultural Project

CHCP is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization committed to providing an environment that is free from discrimination due to race, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, disability, gender, sexual orientation, or age.


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