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  • September 05, 2022 6:00 PM | Elyse Wong (Administrator)


    Former residents of the Chung Mei Boys Home in El Cerrito and their wives reunite for lunch at Tai Wu Restaurant in Millbrae.

    The following is an excerpt from the 09/02/22 NBC Bay Area News:

    By Joe Rosato, Jr.

    The 80 and 90-something-year-old Chinese men shuffling into Millbrae's Tai Wu restaurant on a recent day had much more to share than just lunch. They were there to share a unique camaraderie as children who'd once lived in the Chung Mei Boys Home, an El Cerrito facility that took in Chinese boys between 1935 and 1954. 

    Several times a year, the men and their wives gather together over hot tea and steaming pork buns to compare notes about their time in the home and life under its founder, Dr. Charles Shepherd, the British Baptist minister who founded Chung Mei Home and ran it with the precision of a military academy. Shepherd had witnessed dozens of abandoned and hungry children on the streets of San Francisco's Chinatown and felt compelled to do something. 

    "Definitely there’s no other institution like this and never will be," said Richard Mar, who lived in the home from 1948 to 1953.

    Shepherd established the original Chung Mei Home in Berkeley and then relocated it to El Cerrito in 1935 after outgrowing the previous home. The original El Cerrito building, which now houses a school, stands at 1800 Elm St. and has since been added to the U.S. National Register of Historic Buildings. 

    For more information:  

  • August 29, 2022 5:51 PM | Elyse Wong (Administrator)

    CHCP members (Dave and Eleanor Yick, Connie Young Yu, Gerrye Wong, Leianne Lamb, and Peter Young) plus other audience members celebrated with playwright Steve "Spike" Wong at the grand opening of his play, "White Sky, Falling Dragon," at the Mountain View Center for Performing Arts.

    Banners from the "Chinatown to Battleground" exhibit (CHCP is a sponsor) by the Chinese American G.I. Project were on display at the theater, showcasing a few of the many Chinese American servicemen and women who have fought and served in the U.S. armed forces.

  • August 17, 2022 6:18 PM | Elyse Wong (Administrator)

    The following is an excerpt from the 08/16/22 Fortune magazine:

    By Nicholas Gordon

    A team of researchers has discovered what the Massachusetts Institute of Technology calls the “best semiconductor material ever found,” even better than silicon, the material used in just about every computer chip on earth.

    In July, scientists from MIT, the University of Houston, and other institutions announced they had proved that cubic boron arsenide performs better than silicon at conducting heat and electricity, opening up new possibilities for smaller and faster chips. The team includes China-born professor Gang Chen, the former head of MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering, who was the subject of a yearlong investigation by the Department of Justice before the agency dropped espionage charges because of lack of evidence.

    It could be decades before semiconductors based on cubic boron arsenide are used in commercially available chips—if they prove viable at all. But ultimately, the new material may help designers overcome the natural limits of current models to make better, faster, and smaller chips, and its discovery is the kind of research the U.S. risked missing out on with a now-disbanded crackdown on experts like Chen.

    For more information:  Read the full 08/16/22 Fortune article.

  • August 14, 2022 3:57 PM | Elyse Wong (Administrator)


    Click to enlarge CHCP's special celebration for Spirit of '45: Living History Day at History Park included:


    Click flyer to enlarge.

  • July 25, 2022 5:31 PM | Elyse Wong (Administrator)

    The Speaker Series presenters (pictured in the first photo from left to right) are: William Lee, Richard Mar, emcee Chris Jochim, Janet Chang, and Elena Wong Viskovich.

    In this Speaker Series event, alumni of Chung Mei boys' home and Ming Quong girls' home gathered together to share their stories of resilience and kinship. Alumni from both homes reminisced about their experiences growing up in their respective homes, how they survived and thrived, and ultimately, how it shaped their lives and their drive to succeed. 

    View the recording of the Speaker Series event below:


    Nona Mock Wyman, author of books on the Ming Quong home, who could not participate in the Speaker Series, has contributed a poem and haiku in lieu of her live presence.

    ‘TWO’ ALUMNI OF THE MING QUONG HOME ACHIEVED THEIR GOAL
    WITH THEIR BAMBOO SPIRIT
    THEY PERSEVERED, DELETED THE INFAMOUS WORD:
    “PROSTITUTES”
    FROM THE INNOCENCE OF YOUTH

    MING QUONG’S NAME REPUTEDLY INTACT
    THE SANITY OF THE MQ ALUMNI - AND-
    THE MING QUONG STORE IN WALNUT CREEK
    ARE RADIANTAS IT SHOULD BE;
    FOR “MING QUONG” IN CANTONESE MEANS
    “RADIANT LIGHT”

    BEHIND THESE TWO WOMEN WERE DEDICATED
    MING QUONG ALUMNI
    THEIR ENCOURAGEMENT AND BELIEF COMPELLED THEM ON
    EARNEST CONVERSATIONS;
    WITH UPLIFT FAMILY SERVICES
    BOTH PARTIES AGREED

    THE ORIGINATORS AND TEACHERS OF THE MING QUONG HOME
    CAN NOW REST IN PEACE
    AS EACH ERROR CORRECTED - FOSTERS AMERICA’S TRUE HISTORY
    AMEN - AMEN

    This poem was inspired by the work of Elena Wong and Janet Chang for their passionate mission correcting the inaccuracies of the history of the Ming Quong residents.

    Haiku by Nona:

    CHUNG MEI-MING QUONG BROTHERS, 
    SISTERS, 
    COUSINS, 
    FOUND THEIR SAFE HAVEN

    Be sure to view the first two webinars in this Speaker Series: 

    Also view: 

  • July 13, 2022 3:04 PM | Elyse Wong (Administrator)

    The following is an excerpt from the 07/13/22 HJ News (Herald Journal News):

    By Jeff DeMoss

    The newest monument standing at Box Elder County’s Golden Spike National Historical Park is, by design, one of the first things visitors to the park now see as they approach the site at Promontory Summit.

    The 24-foot-high sculpture, entitled “Monument to Their Memory,” was built to honor all the railroad workers from many different cultures and backgrounds whose backbreaking efforts were crucial in the construction of the nation’s first transcontinental railroad.

    The sculpture consists of metal rails crossed with granite “ties,” reaching into the sky in a curving shape to create the sensation that it is visually crossing the plains mountains on a viewer’s journey to the unknown.

    It is the creation of artist Ilan Averbuch, who is known around the world for his outdoor art installments. Averbuch was selected more than a year ago to design the piece.

    Taking shape this spring after the annual celebration of the completion of the transcontinental railroad, the piece was officially unveiled at a ceremony on June 25.

    Dignitaries from the Northwestern Band of the Shoshone, as well as cultural groups representing the Irish, Chinese and others who built the railroad, were on hand to witness the spectacle.

    For more information:  

  • July 11, 2022 6:25 PM | Elyse Wong (Administrator)


    This CHCP Speaker Series event explored wine industry insights with Ty Tia, Corporate VP at Constellation Brands. Ty injected much value-added and practical information into the presentation that one would not ordinarily get from winery tours.  In addition to providing information about the winemaking process, he presented wine industry insights such as how to judge a wine based on its label, how to tell the difference between a $5 vs $50 wine, how to drink red wine and truly experience it, and how to select the right wines to pair with foods.

    In addition, CHCP Director Erwin Wong shared some information on how the Chinese contributed to the building and growth of the Napa Valley wine region.

    Many comments received after the event indicated that the audience enjoyed the event immensely, showing the event to be both educational and fun.

    View the video of the event: 

  • July 11, 2022 3:46 PM | Elyse Wong (Administrator)

    Click to enlarge Click to enlarge Click to enlarge

  • June 12, 2022 5:26 PM | Elyse Wong (Administrator)

    By Liz Fong Chew, 2022 CHCP Secretary

    It was an excellent day for the dragon boat races at CHCP/History San Jose's Mini Dragon Boat Festival Celebration! The colorful lion danced to the dotting of the eye ceremony and gave life and energy to the dragon boats. Family members and kids raced their boats with excitement... What terrific family teamwork! Thank you to Chef Desmond for providing the traditional Joong Tse (Chinese rice dumpling) Making Demonstration along with a couple to take home.

Museum Address:

History Park
635 Phelan Avenue
San Jose, CA 95112

In Ng Shing Gung Building

Mailing Address:

PO Box 5366
San Jose, CA 95150-5366

Email: info@chcp.org

Chinese Historical & Cultural Project

CHCP is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization committed to providing an environment that is free from discrimination due to race, color, religion, creed, national origin, ancestry, disability, gender, sexual orientation, or age.


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